Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 1980 Issue »

    Success Anxiety in Women

    A Constructivist Interpretation of its Source and its Significance

    Georgia Sassen
    Georgia Sassen examines the distinctly competitive definition of success which has fostered the popular notion that women are afraid to succeed. In analyzing women's anxiety in the face of competitive success, Sassen argues that recent research reveals that it is the climate of competition which arouses the anxiety, not success itself. Drawing upon a constructivist-developmental concept of anxiety, she points out that the "success anxiety" attributed to women might well be a reflection of their essentially female way of constructing reality, as elaborated in recent feminist theory. Sassen concludes by questioning the idea of removing women's success anxiety by training them to compete; she calls instead for a restructuring of institutions so that competition is not the only avenue to success.

    Click here to access this article.



  2. Share

    Spring 1980 Issue

    Abstracts

    The Passion and Challenge of Teaching
    Sophie Freud Loewenstein
    Success Anxiety in Women
    A Constructivist Interpretation of its Source and its Significance
    Georgia Sassen
    Advancing in School Administration
    A Pilot Project for Women
    Kathleen D. Lyman and Jeanne J. Speizer
    Sexism in Teacher Education Texts
    Myra Pollack Sadker and David Miller Sadker
    Employment and Education of Mexican-American Women
    The Interplay of Modernity and Ethnicity in Eight Families
    Maxine Baca Zinn
    Anxiety and Mathematics
    An Update
    Sheila Tobias and Carol Weissbrod
    Call 1-800-513-0763 to order this issue.