Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 1980 Issue »

    Employment and Education of Mexican-American Women

    The Interplay of Modernity and Ethnicity in Eight Families

    Maxine Baca Zinn
    Acculturation has been the major framework used to explain changes in Mexican-American families. It assumes that changing conjugal roles are associated with a corresponding decline in ethnicity. Instead of viewing traditional Mexican values as determinants of conjugal roles, and changes in those roles as the consequence of acculturation, the study examined the effect of wives' employment outside the home and level of education on conjugal interaction. It was found that as women acquired extra-domestic resources, they achieved greater equality in conjugal decision making without sacrificing ethnicity in other realms of family life.

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    Spring 1980 Issue

    Abstracts

    The Passion and Challenge of Teaching
    Sophie Freud Loewenstein
    Success Anxiety in Women
    A Constructivist Interpretation of its Source and its Significance
    Georgia Sassen
    Advancing in School Administration
    A Pilot Project for Women
    Kathleen D. Lyman and Jeanne J. Speizer
    Sexism in Teacher Education Texts
    Myra Pollack Sadker and David Miller Sadker
    Employment and Education of Mexican-American Women
    The Interplay of Modernity and Ethnicity in Eight Families
    Maxine Baca Zinn
    Anxiety and Mathematics
    An Update
    Sheila Tobias and Carol Weissbrod
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