Harvard Educational Review
  1. Winter 1992 Issue »

    Challenging Venerable Assumptions

    Literacy Instruction for Linguistically Different Students

    Maria de la Luz Reyes
    In this article, MarIa de la Luz Reyes identifies, discusses, and challenges widely accepted assumptions that undergird and guide literacy instruction for linguistically different students.’ Citing examples from current research, Reyes shows how the “one size fits all” belief, and its corollary assumptions about the practice ofprocess instruction with limited- and non-English-speaking students, mitigate against the success of these students. The author draws from thefindings of a case study that provides an example ofprocess instruction that proved to be successful not onlyfor mainstream students, bu~ctl~p~fQl/ri.ose who are linguistically different. In concluding, she makes a strong appeal for efforts to tailor literacy instruction to account for the cultural and linguistic diversity of all students, For the author, such adaptations cannot be an afterthought; rather, if teaching practices are to be inclusive of all learners, they must “begin with the explicit premise that each learner brings a valid language and culture to the instructional context.”

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    Winter 1992 Issue

    Abstracts

    Challenging Venerable Assumptions
    Literacy Instruction for Linguistically Different Students
    Maria de la Luz Reyes
    Teacher Research as a Way of Knowing
    Susan L. Lytle and Marilyn Cochran-Smith
    Labels, Literacy, and Enabling Learning
    Glenn's Story
    Colleen M. Fairbanks
    Teaching as a Profession
    The Rochester Case in Historical Perspective
    Christine E. Murray
    A Hearing Teacher's Changing Role in Deaf Education
    Patricia J. Saylor
    Teaching Narratives
    A Source for Faculty Development and Evaluation
    Diane R. Wood
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