Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 2015 Issue »

    “Diles la verdad”

    Deportation Policies, Politicized Funds of Knowledge, and Schooling in Middle Childhood

    SARAH GALLO AND HOLLY LINK
    In this article, Sarah Gallo and Holly Link draw on a five-year ethnographic study of Latina/o immigrant children and their elementary schooling to examine the complexities of how children, teachers, and families in a Pennsylvania town navigate learning within a context of unprecedented deportations. Gallo and Link focus on the experiences and perspectives of one student, his teachers, and his parents to explore how his father’s detainment and potential deportation affected his life and learning across educational contexts such as home, school, and alternative educational spaces. In attending to the ways that this student effectively developed and deployed his knowledge of immigration outside of his classroom spaces, the authors explore the possibilities and tensions of creating safe spaces for students to draw on immigration experiences for learning in school. Rather than maintaining silence around issues of difference like immigration, they call for educational practices and policies that will better prepare educators to recognize and respond to students’ politicized funds of knowledge, the experiences, knowledges, and skills young people deploy and develop across learning contexts that are often not incorporated into classroom settings.

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    Sarah Gallo is an assistant professor of language, education, and society in the department of teaching and learning at The Ohio State University. In her research she draws upon ethnographic and linguistic anthropological tools to explore the language and literacy resources that young Latina/o immigrant children deploy and develop across educational settings. Her work has appeared in journals such as the American Educational Research Journal, the International Multilingual Research Journal, and the Journal of Language, Identity, and Education. Her research and teaching are motivated by a desire to improve educational possibilities for Latina/o immigrant students by supporting educators to better recognize the traditional and innovative resources that immigrant students and families bring to their classrooms.

    Holly Link is a former two-way immersion elementary school teacher, a PhD candidate in Educational Linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education, and a 2014 Spencer Dissertation Fellow. Her dissertation explores how, in their final years of elementary school, children from minoritized backgrounds understand and communicate about success and achievement in an environment of high-stakes testing. Her work has appeared in journals such as Theory into Practice, the International Multilingual Research Journal, the Journal of Language and Identity in Education, and the International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. Her research interests and publications focus on multilingualism, multiliteracies, and the communicative practices and schooling experiences of young people from minoritized backgrounds. More broadly she is interested in collaborative, ethnographic research methods.
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    Fall 2015 Issue

    Abstracts

    “Diles la verdad”
    Deportation Policies, Politicized Funds of Knowledge, and Schooling in Middle Childhood
    SARAH GALLO AND HOLLY LINK
    “My Student Was Apprehended by Immigration”
    A Civics Teacher’s Breach of Silence in a Mixed-Citizenship Classroom
    DAFNEY BLANCA DABACH
    The Art of Unlearning
    CLINT SMITH
    On the Grammar of Silence
    The Structure of My Undocumented Immigrant Writer’s Block
    ALBERTO LEDESMA
    Undocumented Undergraduates on College Campuses
    Understanding Their Challenges and Assets and What It Takes to Make an Undocufriendly Campus
    CAROLA SUÁREZ-OROZCO, DALAL KATSIAFICAS, OLIVIA BIRCHALL, CYNTHIA M. ALCANTAR, EDWIN HERNANDEZ, YULIANA GARCIA, MINAS MICHIKYAN, JANET CERDA, ROBERT T. TERANISHI
    UC Berkeley’s Undocumented Student Program
    Holistic Strategies for Undocumented Student Equitable Success Across Higher Education
    RUBEN ELIAS CANEDO SANCHEZ AND MENG L. SO
    Undocumented Status and Schooling for Newcomer Teens
    ELAINE C. ALLARD
    Editor's Review
    STEPHANY CUEVAS
    Afterword
    Imagined Futures
    ROBERTO G. GONZALES
    Foreword
    Human Rights for Undocumented Students and Their Families
    MARY C. WATERS
    Editors' Introduction
    Dissolving Boundaries: Understanding Undocumented Students’ Educational Experiences
    Untangling Plyler’s Legacy
    Undocumented Students, Schools, and Citizenship
    ROBERTO G. GONZALES, LUISA L. HEREDIA, GENEVIEVE NEGRÓN-GONZALES
    The Unlikelihood of Family
    A Photographic Essay on Transnational Experiences
    CRISTINA LLERENA NAVARRO

    Book Notes

    Everyday Illegal
    Joanna Dreby