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Global Adaptation: Montessori in India The Montessori method has crossed international boundaries since it began in the early 1900s, and it continues to be a global educational method.
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What Is Racial Equity in Education According to Asian Americans? On March 16, 2019, a Chinese American protester held a sign saying “Equity: A code word for Anti-Asian,” during a town hall event in Queens, New York. Participants at the event discussed proposed changes to the admissions policies in New York City’s specialized public high schools. Although many Asian Americans would disagree with the framing of education equity, and in this case proposals for increased racial integration in public schools, as “anti-Asian,” the sentiment this protester expressed is becoming increasingly common among some segments of Asian American communities.
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“Los Músicos”: Mexican Corridos, the Aural Border, and the Evocative Musical Renderings of Transnational Youth Latinx bilinguals and emergent bilinguals are among the most researched youth communities in the field of education. Ironically, however, we know very little about them due to myopic understandings of their skills, abilities, dispositions, interests, and everyday cultural practices (García & Kleifgen, 2018). Moreover, increasingly vile rhetoric about Latinx communities and harsh immigration policies and practices continue to exacerbate the socioeducational context for these youth, shaping how they are viewed both inside and outside of school.
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Controversial Speakers and Intellectual Fairness As political polarization increases in the US, colleges and universities are often treated as ideological battlegrounds. In this context, invited speakers serve as flashpoints for controversy, especially when student protests erupt. Such controversies seem unlikely to abate, and thus campuses would be wise to consider how their responses to controversial speakers support or undermine their educational aims. While much has been written about protecting free speech in such crisis moments, we believe the educational significance of these events warrants deeper consideration. How should colleges and universities navigate campus controversies in order to better foster intellectual and civic development on their campuses?
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Teaching Students How to Think and Argue Together Fake news, alternative facts, post-truth—we live in a time when people find it hard to agree on what to believe or do about many important societal problems, including climate change, gun violence, immigration, and health care. Moreover, we seem to be losing the ability to discuss complex questions in a rational, evidence-based, and respectful manner. Perhaps, we never learned how to do it in the first place.
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The Distrust Beneath the Recent Teacher Strikes Beginning with the well-publicized teacher walkouts in West Virginia and continuing this year in Los Angeles, Denver, and Oakland—teachers across the United States initiated strikes for a variety of reasons: to demand increased social services for students and smaller class sizes, to protest the movement toward the privatization of schools—which has led to budget crises and potential school closings—, and in opposition to other current reforms such as performance-based pay. Although the initial teacher walkouts in 2018 were short and symbolic and frequently organized through social networks, the more recent strikes have been initiated by teacher unions, lasted for days, and drawn wide support from community members and, in a few cities such as Oakland, principals and board members.
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Are In-State Resident Tuition Policies Improving the Health Outcomes of Mexican Noncitizen Immigrants? Amid heated immigration debates, researchers have primarily shown that restrictive immigration policies negatively impact Latina/o immigrant children and families’ health, education, and overall well-being. But what about policies created with a more welcoming spirit?
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Preparing Educators for a Faster Future: The Promise and Challenge of Project-Based Learning In their book Whiplash, Joi Ito and Jeff Howe talk about how best to prepare for a faster future, a future in which the pace of change will only accelerate. They argue for giving individuals more agency and freedom to experiment, to work together to find solutions to increasingly complex problems, and to prototype and iterate more quickly rather than engaging in lengthy planning processes. They also describe the need for more problem-based collaborations, in which people work together to solve a real problem by incorporating their different perspectives and diverse expertise to create a solution. What they describe sounds a lot like a form of education that has come in and out of popularity in the United States—project-based learning.
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Educator Solidarities over Competition: Lessons from 2018 The teachers of the Acero School Network, a charter management organization overseeing fifteen schools in Chicago, became the first charter network in history to stage a strike to protest low pay, poor working conditions, overcrowded classrooms, and “sanctuary” protections for the majority Latino population their schools serve.
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Racial (Mis)Match: Understanding the Phenomenon at a More Nuanced Level How does teacher race impact student achievement? Calls to hire more teachers of color stem, in part, from growing awareness that the US teaching force is predominantly white, but increasingly serves a diverse student population. Further, state-level studies have found that same-race teachers positively impact student outcomes, such as achievement and graduating high school (Egalite, Kisida, & Winters, 2015; Gershenson, Hart, Lindsay, & Papageorge, 2017; McGrady & Reynolds, 2013). While drawing more teachers of color into education is critical, the issue of racial matching in the classroom is complex and needs a more nuanced analysis.
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