Voices in Education

Archives

Showing 141-150 of 301 Posts

Browse all Posts »
Can We Foster School Integration in Our Changing Suburban Communities? America's suburbs are in the middle of a profound racial/ethnic and socioeconomic transformation.
Comments ( )
The Limits and Dangers of McIntosh’s Ideas About White Privilege Recently, a new member, Sam Tanner, joined our collective. Sam is a high school drama teacher and Ph.D. candidate at the University of Minnesota.
Comments ( )
Exploring the Environment with Standards-Based Lessons Throughout most of human history, people have lived in direct contact with nature, growing their own food, raising or killing animals to eat, using trees and stones to build homes, and using water for irrigation, household purposes, and transportation. Since the beginning of time, and long before the existence of formal systems of education, the most important thing humans taught their children was how to survive by exploiting nature’s resources. Not until about 150 years ago, when more people began to live in cities than in the country, and education became more formally organized around the three Rs, did the environment become something optional when it came to education.
Comments ( )
Your Ideas, Your Thoughts, Your Goals, Your Dreams…Your Voice Even with my busy schedule and never-ending to-do list, I always take the time to browse my binder stuffed with hand-written letters, stories, and poems from the incarcerated young people I work with.
Comments ( )
Do Bullying Laws Work? Before 2005, only 15 states had laws about bullying. Since that year, the number of states with laws has more than tripled (according to BullyPolice.Org), yet the debate over the legitimacy and effectiveness of these laws persists.
Comments ( )
Systemic Turnaround: A Strategic Move Out of the Box Children enter schools with different levels of preparedness. Not just in high-poverty areas, but in all schools. Visit any school in the U.S., and teachers will tell you about the wide spread academic needs they address on a daily basis. Yet for well over fifty years, we have educated children using the same traditional structures, arrangements, and approaches.
Comments ( )
“What’s Going on Here?” In 1987, roughly halfway through my 10-year tenure as education director at the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York, several trustees challenged my staff and me to find out if anyone learned from our many educational options. We were asked to be accountable for our teaching: Were we effective? Did people learn what we taught? Sound familiar?
Comments ( )
Five Things Teachers Should Tell Students About Socializing Online Hannah was a fresh-faced 14-year-old, with strikingly pretty reddish-blond hair and an age-appropriate penchant for slightly risky apps and websites. She had an account on Ask.fm, a site where teens pose anonymous questions to their peers. Such anonymity is disinhibiting, and it’s not unusual for the conversations to disintegrate into cruelty.
Comments ( )
Talking About Race with South African Students During a seven-week stay as a visiting professor in South Africa, I was invited to Alexandria High School by its principal, Mr. Matthews.
Comments ( )
Fostering Good Learning Experiences, Starting with High School This would seem an opportune moment in our national history to bring new ideas to the institution of high school. As a parade of commission reports attest, there is growing recognition among stakeholders that high school is not working well for a sizable proportion of young people.
Comments ( )