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Leaders Should Be Learners, Not Experts “Needs improvement” is a warning sign signaling that desperate measures may be needed to achieve proficiency. This is the world in which contemporary school reform is taking place.
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Pedagogy Beyond the White Gaze During a long conversation last winter, Django Paris and H. Samy Alim looked to nuance and extend the emerging concept of culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP).
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A Different Olympic Quest The Sochi Olympics brought us transcendent moments of speed, grace, and power--and the opportunity to wonder: how did they get so good?
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Using the Arts to Turn Schools Around: Evidence builds in favor of integrating arts for positive outcomes Ask students and parents how the arts are seen in their schools, and many will say that they are treated as add-on enrichment programs. But a new national initiative is betting that a full embrace of the arts can be an effective core turnaround strategy for schools with low achievement.
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The Role of Resource Reform in Improvement and Innovation Part of why classrooms look the same as they did more than fifty years ago is the tendency to cling to traditional instructional delivery methods and arrangements.
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Remembering Mandela in a New Demographic Era The death of Nelson Mandela on December 5, 2013, reignited the personal relationship Stella M. Flores has had with South Africa for decades.
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Can We Foster School Integration in Our Changing Suburban Communities? America's suburbs are in the middle of a profound racial/ethnic and socioeconomic transformation.
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The Limits and Dangers of McIntosh’s Ideas About White Privilege Recently, a new member, Sam Tanner, joined our collective. Sam is a high school drama teacher and Ph.D. candidate at the University of Minnesota.
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Exploring the Environment with Standards-Based Lessons Throughout most of human history, people have lived in direct contact with nature, growing their own food, raising or killing animals to eat, using trees and stones to build homes, and using water for irrigation, household purposes, and transportation. Since the beginning of time, and long before the existence of formal systems of education, the most important thing humans taught their children was how to survive by exploiting nature’s resources. Not until about 150 years ago, when more people began to live in cities than in the country, and education became more formally organized around the three Rs, did the environment become something optional when it came to education.
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Your Ideas, Your Thoughts, Your Goals, Your Dreams…Your Voice Even with my busy schedule and never-ending to-do list, I always take the time to browse my binder stuffed with hand-written letters, stories, and poems from the incarcerated young people I work with.
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