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Music, Diversity, and Mission in One Black Student Organization The term diversity is exceedingly common--some would even say conspicuous--in discussions of higher education, yet there is no consensus as to its import or even a precise definition.
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First, Do No Harm As the country searches for ways to keep students safe in schools, we must ensure that our efforts do not hinder academic success or, worse, push students out of school and into the juvenile justice system.
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Five Top Challenges for New Leaders of Instructional Rounds After several years as a network participant, and even more as a leader of rounds and mentor to new facilitators, I am committed to doing more to support rounds work. You might wonder whether you have the ability to lead instructional rounds, but I've helped many others who doubted their capabilities to do so successfully. If you have the desire, and my new book on facilitating rounds, you can do this.
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7 Myths About Cage-Busting Leadership I’ve been on the road this spring, talking with educators, community leaders, advocates, policy makers, and foundation types about my new book, Cage-Busting Leadership. In doing so, I’ve been struck by some of the mythology that seems to shape what people think it means to be a cage-busting principal, superintendent, or school system official. The book argues that school, system, and state leaders can do much more than they often realize but tend to be hindered by a “culture of can’t” in which urban legends (“the contract requires that teacher assignment be driven by seniority—when it actually doesn’t”), misinformation (“we’re not allowed to spend Title I funds that way“), and undue caution (“we’re not sure if that’s an fully approved use of school improvement funds“) stop them from doing what they think will be best for students.
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Lessons from the Data Wise Project Policy initiatives around the Common Core State Standards and teacher evaluation present schools with opportunity and risk. The opportunity is to make more effective use of evidence to inform the education of all of our children; the risk is to think that evidence alone will do the job.
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The Arts and UDL: What General Education Can Learn from the Margins In the national discussions about school and curriculum reform, arts education is continually marginalized, requiring its advocates to keep making the case for the contribution of the arts to academic, social, and personal learning outcomes.
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Deeper Learning and the Common Core The first things I noticed when I walked into classrooms at International High School at Prospect Heights in Brooklyn were the dictionaries. In every room, students sat in groups, and in the middle of the groups they placed their language dictionaries: Spanish-English, Uzbek-English, French-English, and more.
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Universal Design for Learning and Improving Education for Incarcerated Youth On any given day, more than 81,000 youth are confined to residential facilities in the juvenile justice system. These youth are disproportionately students of color (particularly African American males), students from low-income backgrounds, and students with disabilities.
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The Power of Parents Ricky immigrated to California with his parents and four siblings when he was four years old. Although Ricky is very much an American high school student (his history teacher was surprised to learn that he was not born in the United States), his home life very much reflects the experience of an immigrant family.
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Email Dos and Don’ts for Educators Facebook and Twitter may be the newest tools for communicating with families, and good old-fashioned phone calls may still be in order when problems arise. But according to educators and at least one survey, email has become a preferred method of communication between teachers and parents. And, when done right, email can be manageable as well as effective.
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