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Another look at Bias in the SAT As the debate on a possible SAT bias continues, I want to address two among the many possible issues.
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Q&A with Frederick Hess and Eric Osberg Frederick M. Hess and Eric Osberg, editors of Stretching the School Dollar: How Schools and Districts Can Save Money While Serving Students Best, on why there has never been a better time to start talking about solutions for successfully managing school budgets.
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This Is the Moment This is the moment when the education field can prove its mettle. Public interest in schools and the political will to improve them have never been higher. If we don't seriously increase the knowledge and competence of today's students, we may bequeath to our children and grandchildren a nation in decline.
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Bias in the SAT? Seven years ago the Harvard Educational Review published an article that inspired great controversy, fiery rebuttals, and highly technical debates. What was the big deal? And why does it matter today?
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The Little Engine That Could When Helen Featherstone agreed in 1985 to be the editor of a new newsletter based at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, there was no such thing as e-mail, listservs, Google, RSS feeds, or Twitter.
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If Schools Can’t Spend More, They Need to Spend Differently The recent debate over the president's jobs bill centered on how many teachers would be rescued from layoffs. Little or no discussion was heard about which jobs mattered most. Could anyone have dared suggest adding new positions by cutting existing staff even deeper? This might be heresy, but it is necessity.
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The Media Savvy Educator: How to work with the press to educate the public about schools Former Washington Post reporter Linda Perlstein has written about education for 12 years. As the public editor for the Education Writers Association (EWA), she now advises journalists assigned to cover schools for local and national media outlets, and writes “The Educated Reporter” blog for EWA. She is the author of Tested: One American School Struggles to Make the Grade and Not Much Just Chillin’: The Hidden Lives of Middle Schoolers. Perlstein talked to Harvard Education Letter editor Nancy Walser about how educators can work with journalists to improve coverage of schools.
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Not by “Value-Added” Alone Publicly reporting test scores for entire schools is one of the more positive and logical educational innovations in recent years. Perhaps this is why someone at the L.A. Times thought it might be a good idea to take this one step further and report scores for individual teachers. Or perhaps someone just wanted to make headlines. Did they succeed?
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The “Boy Crisis”: Beyond Reading to Relationships Michael Sadowski makes some extremely thoughtful points about what growing numbers of scholars and the popular press have come to refer to as a "crisis"in boys' ongoing academic failure in American public schools. Sadowski argues that we must go "beyond gender" to the highly potent embedded contexts of social class, ethnicity, and race.
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Can "Learning for Jobs" work in the U.S.? Across today's developed countries, educators, policymakers, and economists recognize that the new "knowledge economy" demands different, higher-level skills than the 20th-century high school or upper secondary school provided.
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