Harvard Educational Review
  1. Summer 1974 Issue »

    Credentialing by Tests or by Degrees

    Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and Griggs v. Duke Power Company

    Sheila Huff
    Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972 made it unlawful for an employer to use the results of a test to discriminate because of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. If a group could show an adverse effect based on such a test, the employer had to prove the test was job-related. Griggs v. Duke Power Company challenged this principle, and the Supreme Court struck down the use of general aptitude tests and a high school diploma requirement for certain jobs. In this article, the author traces the evolution of Title VII and the Griggs precedent, looking at their implications for education in two ways. First, as the educational system is an employer, it must interpret the law for its own hiring and promotion practices. Second, as educational requirements and credentials are struck down by the courts, there could be major changes in the enrollment patterns, content, and functions of public schools and institutions of higher education.

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    Summer 1974 Issue

    Abstracts

    Children's Television More than Mere Entertainment
    Aimee Dorr Leifer, Neal J. Gordon, Sherryl Browne Graves
    Credentialing by Tests or by Degrees
    Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and Griggs v. Duke Power Company
    Sheila Huff
    Hostos
    Report from a Ghetto College
    Barry Castro
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