Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 1976 Issue »

    Conflict and Consensus Revisited

    Notes toward a Reinterpretation of American Educational History

    Carl F. Kaestle
    Since the early 1950s, educational historians have increasingly turned their attention to the role of social conflict in the creation of public schools. Consensus historians claim that most Americans were in agreement on the issue of free public education, while recent conflict historians posit that the social elite imposed public schooling on the working class. Author Carl Kaestle suggests that each view contains elements of the truth but that both are reductionist. In this article, he briefly examines these interpretations and then suggests improved models of historical research to define more precisely and elegantly the relationship between conflict and consensus in American educational history.

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    Fall 1976 Issue

    Abstracts

    Introduction
    The History of the History of American Education, 1900-1976
    The Uses of the Past
    Sol Cohen
    The Role of Education in American History
    A Memorandum for the Committee Advising the Fund for the Advancement of Education in Regard to This Subject
    Richard J. Storr
    Ways of Seeing
    An Essay on the History of Compulsory Schooling
    David B. Tyack
    Conflict and Consensus Revisited
    Notes toward a Reinterpretation of American Educational History
    Carl F. Kaestle
    From Religion to Politics
    Debates and Confrontations over American College Governance in the Mid-Eighteenth Century
    Jurgen Herbst
    Education for Freedom
    Children's Fiction in Jacksonian America
    Anne Scott MacLeod
    Before Home Start
    Notes toward a History of Parent Education in America, 1897-1929
    Steven L. Schlossman
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