Harvard Educational Review
  1. Winter 1976 Issue »

    Academic Evaluation and Grading

    An Analysis and Some Proposals

    John F. Huntley
    The problem of "grade inflation," soaring since the 1960s, has prompted condemnation of current grading practices and calls for reform of the system of academic evaluation. Reformers decry the predominant ABC model of grading, and its offspring the GPA, as failing to convey much valid information about actual student mastery of learning, relative either to peers' achievements or to objective criteria. In this article, John F. Huntley describes the inadequacies of the present grading system and offers a new model, based upon intrinsic rather than extrinsic evaluation. He attempts to root his intrinsic evaluation system in a standard which is more clearcut than the letter-grade model and therefore less subject to grade inflation. After relating how intrinsic evaluation fared in his own classroom practice, he suggests ways in which his approach might be used more widely.

    Click here to purchase this article.

  2. Share

    Winter 1976 Issue

    Abstracts

    Educational Expansion in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Massachusetts
    Human-Capital Formation or Structural Reinforcement?
    Alexander James Field
    Loss as a Theme in Social Policy
    David K. Cohen
    Race, Politics, and the Courts
    School Desegregation in San Francisco
    David L. Kirp
    Academic Evaluation and Grading
    An Analysis and Some Proposals
    John F. Huntley
    Call 1-800-513-0763 to order this issue.