Harvard Educational Review
  1. Summer 1978 Issue »

    No Simple Answer

    Critique of the Follow Through Evaluation

    Ernest R. House, Gene V Glass, Leslie D. McLean, Decker F. Walker
    Follow Through has been the largest and most expensive federal educational experiment in this country's history. Conceived in 1967 as an extension of Head Start, Follow Through was designed as a service program to improve the schooling of disadvantaged children in the early elementary grades. Before it was under way, however, an expected 120 million appropriation was slashed to only 15 milion for the first year. A decision was then made by the U.S. Office of Education to convert the program into a planned variation experiment, which systematically would compare pupils enrolled in different models of early childhood education— the Follow Through models—to each other and to pupils from non-Follow Through classes.

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    Summer 1978 Issue

    Abstracts

    Perspectives on the Follow Through Evalution
    No Simple Answer
    Critique of the Follow Through Evaluation
    Ernest R. House, Gene V Glass, Leslie D. McLean, Decker F. Walker
    Pardon Us, But What Was the Question Again?
    A Response to the Critique of the Follow Through Evaluation
    Richard B. Anderson, Robert G. St. Pierre, Elizabeth C. Proper, Linda B. Stebbins
    Follow Through Redux
    A Response to the Critique by House, Glass, McLean, and Walker
    Carl E. Wisler, Gerald P. Burns, Jr., David Iwamoto
    The Worth of the Follow Through Experience
    Walter L. Hodges
    Understanding the Equity Consequences of School-Finance Reform
    Lee S. Friedman, Michael Wiseman
    Individualism, Collectivism, and Radical Educational Reform
    Elizabeth Cagan
    Essay Reviews
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