Harvard Educational Review
  1. Winter 1981 Issue »

    Reducing Student Alienation in High Schools

    Implications of Theory

    Fred M. Newmann
    Student alienation is a difficult problem facing many U. S. high schools. Not only does it adversely affect the quality of student life, but it is an underlying factor in other school problems such as violence, vandalism, and poor achievement. Drawing on an extensive literature, Fred M. Newmann develops six guidelines for reducing student alienation. The guidelines are used to show why current efforts in school reform have failed to provide a comprehensive solution to this increasingly troublesome problem.

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    Winter 1981 Issue

    Abstracts

    Report Analysis
    Public and Private Schools
    Marya R. Levenson, Dawn Geronimo Terkla
    Evidence, Analysis, and Unanswered Questions
    Richard J. Murnane
    The Issue Is Still Equality of Educational Opportunity
    Jomills Henry Braddock II
    Disciplined Inquiry or Policy Argument?
    Anthony S. Bryk
    Why Public and Private Schools Matter
    Chester E. Finn, Jr.
    Unasked Questions
    James W. Guthrie
    Policy Implications of the Public and Private School Debates
    Barbara L. Heyns
    Questions and Answers
    Our Response
    James Coleman, Thomas Hoffer, Sally Kilgore
    Reducing Student Alienation in High Schools
    Implications of Theory
    Fred M. Newmann
    The Allen School
    An Alternative Nineteenth-Century Education, 1818-1852
    Judith Strong Albert
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