Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 1997 Issue »

    Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, Which Is the Fairest Test of All?

    An Examination of the Equitability of Portfolio Assessment Relative to Standardized Tests

    Jonathan A. Supovitz, Robert T. Brennan
    Do alternative assessments result in greater equity than standardized tests with regard to gender, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity? In this article, Jonathan Supovitz and Robert Brennan investigate this question and find that, in the Rochester, New York, school system, gender, socioeconomic, and racial inequities persist even with alternative assessment, although alternative assessments have a smaller gap between Blacks and Whites, and a larger one between the sexes, than do standardized tests. The authors conclude that alternative assessments have potential to decrease the inequities seen with standardized tests, but they caution that care be taken in the development of such assessments to reduce cultural and other biases.

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    Fall 1997 Issue

    Abstracts

    Dual-Language Immersion Programs
    A Cautionary Note Concerning the Education of Language-Minority Students
    Guadalupe Valdes
    Language in Thinking and Learning
    Pedagogy and the New Whorfian Framework
    Penny Lee
    Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, Which Is the Fairest Test of All?
    An Examination of the Equitability of Portfolio Assessment Relative to Standardized Tests
    Jonathan A. Supovitz, Robert T. Brennan
    Elite College Discrimination and the Limits of Conflict Theory
    Richard Farnum
    The More We Get Together
    Improving Collaboration Between Educators and Their Lawyers
    Jay P. Heubert
    Further Comment
    Haithe Anderson, Patti Lather

    Book Notes

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