Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 2002 Issue »

    Complexity, Accountability, and School Improvement

    Jennifer A. O'Day
    In this article, Jennifer O'Day builds on her earlier work defining and examining the standards-based reform movement in the United States. Here, O'Day explores accountability mechanisms currently associated with standards-based reform efforts that "take the school as the unit of accountability and seek to improve student learning by improving the functioning of the school organization." She examines such accountability mechanisms using the theoretical framework of complexity theory and focuses on how information travels through complex systems, with the understanding that information, its existence and usage, is key to improving schools. Drawing on work conducted with researchers at the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE), she contrasts the Chicago Public Schools' outcomes-based bureaucratic accountability approach with the combination of administrative and professional accountability found in the Baltimore City Schools. She argues that the combination of administrative and professional accountability presents a much more promising approach for implementing lasting and meaningful school reform. (pp. 293-329)

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    Fall 2002 Issue

    Abstracts

    Complexity, Accountability, and School Improvement
    Jennifer A. O'Day
    Diversity and Higher Education
    Theory and Impact on Educational Outcomes
    Patricia Gurin, Eric L. Dey, Sylvia Hurtado, and Gerald Gurin
    Democracy and Education
    The Missing Link May Be Ours
    John Willinsky

    Book Notes

    Why Don’t They Learn English?
    By Lucy Tse

    Overlooked and Underserved
    By Jorge Ruiz-de-Velasco, Michael Fix, and Beatriz Chu Clewell

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