Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 2003 Issue »

    The Use of Argumentation in Haitian Creole Science Classrooms

    Josiane Hudicourt-Barnes
    In this article, Josiane Hudicourt-Barnes critiques the claim that Haitian children cannot actively engage in science classrooms. Drawing from her own work as a bilingual science teacher and educational researcher, Hudicourt-Barnes highlights the Haitian cultural practice of bay odyans, a form of discourse similiar to scientific argumentation, as a potential building block for engaging Haitian children in scientific inquiry. She offers specific examples of Haitian students recreating bay odyans in science classrooms, and suggests that these students have a cultural experience that predisposes them to scientific inquiry. In making links between culture, scientific inquiry, and pedagogy, Hudicourt-Barnes seeks to broaden the research perspective on Haitian students and discourage the use of research paradigms that ignore the impact of culture in the classroom. (pp. 73-93)

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    Spring 2003 Issue

    Abstracts

    Correcting the SAT's Ethnic and Social-Class Bias
    A Method for Reestimating SAT Scores
    Roy O. Freedle
    Constructing Women's Status
    Policy Discourses of University Women's Commission Reports
    Elizabeth J. Allan
    The Use of Argumentation in Haitian Creole Science Classrooms
    Josiane Hudicourt-Barnes

    Book Notes

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