Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 2005 Issue »

    Students’ Development in Theory and Practice

    The Doubtful Role of Research

    Kieran Egan
    In this article, Kieran Egan contests the scientific foundations of Piaget’s developmental theories and the scientific basis of much educational research. In so doing, he pushes researchers and practitioners alike to rethink the centrality of Piaget’s tenets to teaching and learning. Egan traces the history of the developmental literature that preceded Piaget. In particular, he examines the thoughts of Rousseau and Spencer regarding cognitive development, and how the ideas of both men informed those of Piaget. Throughout, Egan critiques the notion that these developmental theories are based on empirical evidence. Through this critique, he enters the current debate on the role of scientific inquiry in educational research and practice.

    Click here to access this article.

    Click here to purchase this article.
  2. Share

    Spring 2005 Issue

    Abstracts

    Introduction
    Gary Orfield
    Does History Matter in Education Research?
    A Brief for the Humanities in an Age of Science
    Ellen Condliffe Lagemann
    Students’ Development in Theory and Practice
    The Doubtful Role of Research
    Kieran Egan
    Public Education in the Twentieth Century and Beyond
    High Hopes, Broken Promises, and an Uncertain Future
    Sonia Nieto
    What “Counts” as Educational Policy?
    Notes toward a New Paradigm
    Jean Anyon
    Comparative and International Education
    A Journey toward Equality and Equity
    Nelly P. Stromquist
    Afterword
    Kevin K. Kumashiro