Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 2011 Issue »

    Beyond Delinquent Citizenships

    Immigrant Youth’s (Re)Visions of Citizenship and Belonging in a Globalized World

    Anne Ríos-Rojas
    Using ethnographic fieldwork conducted in a public high school located in the greater Barcelona area, Anne Ríos-Rojas focuses on the experiences of immigrant youth as they negotiate a sense of belonging in an ever more globalized society. Ríos-Rojas pays particular attention to the multiple and at times contradictory ways in which youth maneuver within a social landscape that is flooded with confusing messages about what it means to belong (or not) in a new society. Drawing richly on their voices, she describes how these youth navigate through discourses that at times locate them as delinquents and terrorists and, at other times, as victims who require saving—but always as outsiders. She concludes with an exploration of the theoretical and practical implications of attending to youth’s (re)visions of belonging and citizenship within an increasingly complex globalized world.

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    Anne Ríos-Rojas is currently a doctoral candidate in education at the University of California, Santa Cruz, specializing in the social and cultural contexts of education. Her work is devoted to examining the nuances of immigrant youths’ schooling and its intersections with power within liberal democratic societies. Her dissertation, funded by the National Science Foundation through the Children of Immigrants in Schools (CIS) Project, is a school ethnography examining the ways in which larger discourses of citizenship and belonging intersect with raced, classed, and gendered ideologies to organize school and social life for immigrant youth in a public high school located in the greater Barcelona area. Ríos-Rojas’s work has appeared in Current Issues in Comparative Education (coauthored with Margaret Gibson), and she is currently working on a manuscript undergoing external peer review at the Anthropology and Education Quarterly.
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    Spring 2011 Issue

    Abstracts

    Becoming Something Different
    Learning from Esmé
    Colleen M. Fairbanks, Penny Mason Crooks, Mary Ariail
    “It’s Going to Stop in This Generation”
    Women with a History of Child Abuse Resolving to Raise Their Children Without Abuse
    Sioux Hall
    What Does Injustice Have to Do with Me?
    A Pedagogy of the Privileged
    David Nurenberg
    Beyond Delinquent Citizenships
    Immigrant Youth’s (Re)Visions of Citizenship and Belonging in a Globalized World
    Anne Ríos-Rojas
    "Doing Right By"
    Teacher Aides, Students with Disabilities, and Relational Social Justice
    Gill Rutherford
    Rebooting the EdD
    Jon F. Wergin

    Book Notes

    To Teach
    William Ayers and Ryan Alexander-Tanner