Harvard Educational Review
  1. Summer 2012 Issue »

    Legally White, Socially “Mexican”

    The Politics of De Jure and De Facto School Segregation in the American Southwest

    Rubén Donato and Jarrod S. Hanson
    The history of Mexican American school segregation is complex, often misunderstood, and currently unresolved. The literature suggests that Mexican Americans experienced de facto segregation because it was local custom and never sanctioned at the state level in the American Southwest. However, the same literature suggests that Mexican Americans experienced de jure segregation because school officials implemented various policies that had the intended effect of segregating Mexican Americans. Rubén Donato and Jarrod S. Hanson argue in this article that although Mexican Americans were legally categorized as “White,” the American public did not recognize the category and treated Mexican Americans as socially “colored” in their schools and communities. Second, although there were no state statutes that sanctioned the segregation of Mexican Americans, it was a widespread trend in the American Southwest. Finally, policies and practices historically implemented by school officials and boards of education should retroactively be considered de jure segregation.

    Click here to access this article.

    Rubén Donato is professor of education at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He is an educational historian and author of The Other Struggle for Equal Schools: Mexican Americans during the Civil Rights Era (1997) and Mexicans and Hispanos in Colorado Schools and Communities, 1920–1960 (2007), both with SUNY Press.

    Jarrod S. Hanson received his JD from the University of Chicago and is a doctoral student in the School of Education, University of Colorado at Boulder. His research focuses on deliberative democracy, civic education, and education ethics. He has experience as a secondary social studies teacher and as an attorney in the areas of public law and finance.


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    Summer 2012 Issue

    Abstracts

    Critical Bifocality and Circuits of Privilege
    Expanding Critical Ethnographic Theory and Design
    Lois Weis and Michelle Fine
    Legally White, Socially “Mexican”
    The Politics of De Jure and De Facto School Segregation in the American Southwest
    Rubén Donato and Jarrod S. Hanson
    Responding to Racism and Racial Trauma in Doctoral Study
    An Inventory for Coping and Mediating Relationships
    Kimberly A. Truong and Samuel D. Museus
    Identity Constructions and Negotiations Among 1.5- and Second-Generation Nigerians
    The Impact of Family, School, and Peer Contexts
    Janet T. Awokoya
    Call and Responsibility
    Critical Questions for Youth Spoken Word Poetry
    Susan Weinstein and Anna West

    Book Notes

    Changing on the Job
    Jennifer Garvey Berger

    “Multiplication Is for White People”
    Lisa Delpit

    American Teacher
    Vanessa Roth and Brian McGinn (Directors)