Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 2012 Issue »

    Coming Home

    Hermanos Académicos Reflect on Past and Present Realities as Professors at Their Alma Mater

    Richard J. Reddick and Victor B. Sáenz
    In this article, Richard J. (Rich) Reddick and Victor B. Sáenz, two assistant professors of color, utilize scholarly personal narrative to reflect on their trajectory from undergraduates at a predominantly White institution—one prominently mired in a legacy of discrimination and exclusion toward people of color—to faculty members at that same institution. Employing the concept of (in)visibility to discuss their alternating feelings of exclusion and acceptance in the university community, Reddick and Sáenz describe how they endeavor to maintain their senses of self through the support of family, mentors, and their home communities. The institution’s efforts to reconcile its difficult history through community outreach and structural changes provide what appears to be a safe space for these hermanos académicos (academic brothers), though the two scholars continue to struggle with multiple and sometimes competing responsibilities: navigating the institution, retaining their cultural integrity, and meeting the demands of the academy. The authors conclude by making recommendations for institutions invested in increasing faculty diversity and calling for greater use of scholarly personal narratives to detail the experiences of underrepresented communities in predominantly White institutions.

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    Richard J. Reddick is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Administration at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is also an affiliate with the John Warfield Center for African and African American Studies and the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies. He researches the experiences of black faculty at predominantly white institutions, faculty mentoring of black students, and the work-family balance among junior faculty male professors. Reddick’s work has appeared in journals such as the American Educational Research Journal, Mentoring and Tutoring, and Journal of Faculty Development, and he has coedited and co-authored four scholarly books. He was a 2010–2011 Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Career Enhancement Fellow and in 2012 was named an Outstanding Young Texas Ex by the Ex-Students’ Association of the University of Texas at Austin.

    Victor B. Sáenz is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Administration at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is also a faculty fellow with the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement and a faculty affiliate with the Center for Mexican American Studies. His current research examines Latino males at two- and four-year institutions as they successfully navigate their college pathways. In 2009, Sáenz was named by Diverse Magazine as “One of 25 to Watch” diversity leaders in higher education. Over the years, he has published in many top journals in the field of education and has been quoted and cited in numerous news stories, policy reports, and scholarly publications. He is a member of two distinguished editorial boards for peer-reviewed journals in his field, and he is an active member of several national associations focused on education.
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    Fall 2012 Issue

    Abstracts

    Youth and Citizenship in the Digital Age
    A View from Egypt
    Linda Herrera
    Coming Home
    Hermanos Académicos Reflect on Past and Present Realities as Professors at Their Alma Mater
    Richard J. Reddick and Victor B. Sáenz
    Designing Indigenous Language Revitalization
    Mary Hermes, Megan Bang, and Ananda Marin
    The Illusion of Inclusion
    A Critical Race Theory Textual Analysis of Race and Standards
    Julian Vasquez Heilig, Keffrelyn Brown, and Anthony Brown

    Book Notes

    Financing American Higher Education in the Era of Globalization
    William Zumeta, David W. Breneman, Patrick M. Callan, and Joni E. Finney