Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 2015 Issue »

    Education and the Production of Diasporic Citizens in El Salvador

    ANDREA DYRNESS AND ENRIQUE SEPÚLVEDA III
    In this article, Dyrness and Sepúlveda argue that in El Salvador, young people are participants in a diasporic social imaginary that connects them with Salvadorans and other Latinos in the United States—before they have ever left the country. The authors explore how this transnational relationship manifests in two school communities in San Salvador: a private school long recognized as a gateway to the elite and a public school serving one of the most violent and impoverished urban marginalized communities in San Salvador. Focusing on two different contexts of socialization—“homeboy” expressive culture and school-based English instruction—they argue that both groups of students were experiencing contradictory forces of cultural socialization that are characteristic of the diaspora.

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    Andrea Dyrness is an associate professor of educational studies at Trinity College. She teaches in the areas of international and urban education, and her research addresses the relationship among education, cultural identity, and citizenship in societies affected by transnational migration. She has conducted research with transnational Latino communities in California, El Salvador, and Spain. Dyrness received her BA in anthropology and educational studies from Brown University and her master’s and PhD in social and cultural studies in education from the University of California at Berkeley, and she was a Fulbright fellow in El Salvador. She is the author of Mothers United: An Immigrant Struggle for Socially Just Education (University of Minnesota Press, 2011).

    Enrique Sepúlveda III is an associate professor in the School of Education at the University of Saint Joseph in West Hartford, Connecticut. He is the son of Mexican mi-grant workers, and in his early career he worked as a bilingual teacher and school principal in California’s Central Valley. He has conducted research projects in communities and schools heavily impacted by global migration in northern California, San Salvador, El Salvador, and Madrid, Spain. His research examines how Latino migrants negotiate global migration, citizenship, and belonging within schools and communities in both sending and receiving contexts. Sepúlveda has published in the Harvard Educational Review special issue on Immigration, Youth, and Education (Fall 2011) and is currently working on an edited volume on Latino migrations titled Global Latin(o) Americanos: Transoceanic Diasporas and Regional Migrations (Oxford University Press, 2015).
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    Spring 2015 Issue

    Abstracts

    At the End of Intellectual Disability
    CHRISTOPHER KLIEWER, DOUGLAS BIKLEN, AND AMY J. PETERSEN
    Ethical and Professional Norms in Community-Based Research
    GERALD CAMPANO, MARÍA PAULA GHISO, AND BETHANY J. WELCH
    Lead Policy and Academic Performance
    Insights from Massachusetts
    JESSICA WOLPAW REYES
    Education and the Production of Diasporic Citizens in El Salvador
    ANDREA DYRNESS AND ENRIQUE SEPÚLVEDA III

    Book Notes

    Our School
    Sam Chaltain

    Laboratory of Learning
    Sharon Gay Pierson

    The Quest for Mastery
    Sam M. Intrator and Don Siegel