Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 2016 Issue »

    La unión hace la fuerza

    Community Organizing in Adult Education for Immigrants

    RUSSELL H. CARLOCK JR.
    Adult English as a second language (ESL) educators have struggled to move beyond skills-based instruction to implement more student-centered, contextualized pedagogy that prepares students to become active citizens and to solve real-world problems, even as the growing number of immigrants make adult education increasingly important for determining the future of civic life in the United States. In this article, Russell Carlock investigates how community organizing can support adult education to foster democratic engagement among immigrant parents. The author co-taught and observed ESL classes with a community-based organization in the Boston area and examined how organizing strategies supported a content-based, student-centered curriculum that encouraged immigrant parents’ civic engagement in their children’s school and the wider community. Ethnographic data revealed two components of community organizing that catalyzed activism among immigrant parents in an adult ESL class: building a civic learning community and developing a public voice. Findings suggest that adult educators may use organizing to facilitate deeper learning and civic action among students. 

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    Russell H. Carlock Jr. teaches high school US history and coordinates the world languages and English as a second or other language programs for Albemarle County Public Schools in Virginia. He earned his doctorate from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and his research focuses on the ethnographic study of community organizing, parent engagement in education, and the experiences of linguistically minoritized students in schools. Carlock serves on the National Research Ideas Group for the WIDA Consortium and has conducted research for the Center on the Developing Child and Project Zero at Harvard University. His teaching and research are motivated by a desire to improve equity in educational opportunity in communities of linguistic, socioeconomic, and ethnic diversity. 
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    Spring 2016 Issue

    Abstracts

    The Visible Hand
    Markets, Politics, and Regulation in Post-Katrina New Orleans
    HURIYA JABBAR
    (Re)Imagining Black Boyhood
    Toward a Critical Framework for Educational Research
    MICHAEL J. DUMAS and JOSEPH DERRICK NELSON
    “Hitting the Streets”
    Youth Street Involvement as Adaptive Well-Being
    TARA M. BROWN
    College Pride, Native Pride
    A Portrait of a Culturally Grounded Precollege Access Program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Students
    ADRIENNE J. KEENE
    La unión hace la fuerza
    Community Organizing in Adult Education for Immigrants
    RUSSELL H. CARLOCK JR.

    Book Notes

    (Un)Learning Disability
    AnnMarie D. Baines