Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 2016 Issue »

    The Visible Hand

    Markets, Politics, and Regulation in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    HURIYA JABBAR
    In this article Huriya Jabbar examines how the regulatory environment in post–Hurricane Katrina New Orleans has influenced choice, incentives, and competition among schools. While previous research has highlighted the mechanisms of competition and individual choice—the “invisible hand”—and the creation of markets in education, Jabbar focuses here on how markets, especially those in education, are also governed by the “visible” hand of the government, which, through regulations and policies, influences how they operate and the outcomes they generate. She compares two governing agencies to examine how the different policy environments in New Orleans shaped school leaders’ perceptions of competition and their behavioral responses to it. Her findings indicate that governing agencies constrain or enable school leaders’ ability to respond to market pressures, sometimes mitigating and other times exacerbating inequities in the marketplace. These findings can inform other school districts across the United States as they adopt market-based reforms, providing directions for ensuring that such policies are equitable.

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    Huriya Jabbar is an assistant professor of education policy at the University of Texas at Austin, where she studies the social and political dimensions of market-based reforms in education. Her work, which has focused on school choice policy, privatization, the politics of research on market-based reforms, and student decision making in higher education, has been published in journals such as the American Educational Research Journal, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, and Educational Researcher. She is also a research associate at the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans at Tulane University, where she continues to study issues related to school choice in New Orleans. 
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    Spring 2016 Issue

    Abstracts

    The Visible Hand
    Markets, Politics, and Regulation in Post-Katrina New Orleans
    HURIYA JABBAR
    (Re)Imagining Black Boyhood
    Toward a Critical Framework for Educational Research
    MICHAEL J. DUMAS and JOSEPH DERRICK NELSON
    “Hitting the Streets”
    Youth Street Involvement as Adaptive Well-Being
    TARA M. BROWN
    College Pride, Native Pride
    A Portrait of a Culturally Grounded Precollege Access Program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Students
    ADRIENNE J. KEENE
    La unión hace la fuerza
    Community Organizing in Adult Education for Immigrants
    RUSSELL H. CARLOCK JR.

    Book Notes

    (Un)Learning Disability
    AnnMarie D. Baines