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Education Policy

Teaching and Learning for the Twenty-First Century

Educational Goals, Policies, and Curricula from Six Nations
Edited by Fernando M. Reimers and Connie K. Chung

This book describes how different nations have defined the core competencies and skills that young people will need in order to thrive in the twenty-first-century, and how those nations have fashioned educational policies and curricula meant to promote those skills. The book examines six countries—Chile, China, India, Mexico, Singapore, and the United States—exploring how each one defines, supports, and cultivates those competencies that students will need in order to succeed in the current century.

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Teaching in Context

The Social Side of Education Reform
Edited by Esther Quintero, Foreword by Andy Hargreaves

Teaching in Context provides new evidence from a range of leading scholars showing that teachers become more effective when they work in organizations that support them in comprehensive and coordinated ways. The studies featured in the book suggest an alternative approach to enhancing teacher quality: creating conditions and school structures that facilitate the transmission and sharing of knowledge among teachers, allowing teachers to work together effectively, and capitalizing on what we know about how educators learn and improve. The studies also show how social dynamics influence the speed, depth, and success with which any new idea is implemented, and how policies enacted without adequate consideration of their impact on the social fabric of schools can produce unintended negative consequences.

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The End of Exceptionalism in American Education

The Changing Politics of School Reform
Jeffrey R. Henig

Over the past fifty years, the “special status” of education decision-making has been eroded. Once the province of local and state school boards, decisions about schools and schooling have begun to emerge in every level and branch of government. In The End of Exceptionalism in American Education, Jeffrey R. Henig traces the roots of this tectonic shift in school governance.

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The Enduring Legacy of Rodriguez

Creating New Pathways to Equal Educational Opportunity
Edited by Charles J. Ogletree, Jr. and Kimberly Jenkins Robinson, foreword by James E. Ryan

In this ambitious volume, leading legal and educational scholars examine San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez (1973), the landmark US Supreme Court decision that held that the Constitution does not guarantee equality of educational opportunity. Charles J. Ogletree, Jr., and Kimberly Jenkins Robinson have brought together a host of experts in their field to examine the road that led up to the Rodriguez decision, assess the successes and failures of the reforms that followed in its wake, and lay out an array of creative strategies for addressing the ongoing inequality of resources and socioeconomic segregation that perpetuate the inequity of opportunity in education.

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The Every Student Succeeds Act

What It Means for Schools, Systems, and States
Edited by Frederick M. Hess and Max Eden, Afterword by Mitchell D. Chester

In this foundational book, Frederick M. Hess and Max Eden bring together a cross-section of respected academics and journalists to examine key aspects of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

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The Infrastructure of Accountability

Data Use and the Transformation of American Education
Edited by Dorothea Anagnostopoulos, Stacey A. Rutledge, and Rebecca Jacobsen, foreword by Jeffrey R. Henig

The Infrastructure of Accountability brings together leading and emerging scholars who set forth an ambitious conceptual framework for understanding the full impact of large-scale, performance-based accountability systems on education.

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The Leading Edge of Early Childhood Education

Linking Science to Policy for a New Generation
Edited by Nonie K. Lesaux and Stephanie M. Jones, Afterword by Jacqueline Jones

The Leading Edge of Early Childhood Education aims to support the effort to simultaneously scale up and improve the quality of early childhood education by bringing together relevant insights from emerging research to provide guidance for this critical, fledgling field. It reflects the growing recognition that early childhood experiences have a powerful effect on children’s later academic achievement and long-term life outcomes.

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The New Education Philanthropy

Politics, Policy, and Reform
Edited by Frederick M. Hess and Jeffrey R. Henig

Philanthropic foundations play an increasingly influential role in education research, policy, and practice—yet this sector has been subject to little research-informed analysis. In The New Education Philanthropy, Frederick M. Hess and Jeffrey R. Henig convene a diverse group of scholars and analysts to examine the shifting role of education philanthropy over the last decade, giving particular attention to the large national foundations—Gates, Broad, Walton, and Lumina, among others—that are increasingly aggressive and strategic in their use of funds. Drawing on original research, they investigate and assess the impact of new patterns in foundation giving for advocacy and research; the divergence in funding strategies between old and new foundations; the extension of “venture philanthropy” to higher education; and the backlash against “reform” philanthropy as well as the unlikely partnerships it forges.

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The Teacher Insurgency

A Strategic and Organizing Perspective
Leo Casey

In The Teacher Insurgency, Leo Casey addresses how the unexpected wave of recent teacher strikes has had a dramatic impact on American public education, teacher unions, and the larger labor movement. Casey explains how this uprising was not only born out of opposition to government policies that underfunded public schools and deprofessionalized teaching, but was also rooted in deep-seated changes in the economic climate, social movements, and, most importantly, educational politics.

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Unaccompanied Minors

Immigrant Youth, School Choice, and the Pursuit of Equity
Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj

School choice—now a pillar of education reform in the United States—is widely touted as a strategy for addressing educational inequity. Yet efforts to implement school choice can exacerbate, rather than counteract, inequities. Unaccompanied Minors takes a close look at the experience of immigrant students and their families navigating New York City’s mandatory high school choice program.

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